斯坦福大学心理学家 Kelly McGonigal 在本期的 TED 演讲中告诉大家跟压力做好朋友不仅可以不让压力打倒你,还能够让你在压力下保持健康积极的生活状态。演讲中,她提到了两项研究,均证明了她的观点:压力是否影响你,取决于你对压力的态度。以下是演讲中关于这两项研究的内容。

【第一项研究】

Now, if you were actually in this study,you'd probably be a little stressed out. Your heart might be pounding, you might be breathing faster, maybe breaking out into a sweat. And normally, we interpret these physical changes as anxiety or signs that we aren't coping very well with the pressure.
如果你此刻的确在(社会压力测试的)研究中,你或许已经有点儿承受不住了。你的心跳开始加快,你的呼吸开始便急促,可能还会开始冒汗。通常,我们认为这些生理上的变化是紧张的表现,说明我们无法很好的应对压力。

But what if you viewed them instead as signs that your body was energized, was preparing you to meet this challenge? Now that is exactly what participants were told in a study conducted at Harvard University. Before they went through the social stress test, they were taught to rethink their stress response as helpful. That pounding heart is preparing you for action. If you're breathing faster, it's no problem. It's getting more oxygen to your brain. And participants who learned to view the stress response as helpful for their performance, well, they were less stressed out, less anxious, more confident, but the most fascinating finding to me was how their physical stress response changed.
但是,如果我们将这些表现看做是身体进入备战状态的表现会怎么样?在哈佛大学的一项研究中,参与者正是这么被告知的。实验参与者进入社会压力测试之前被告知,他们面对压力时的反应是有益的。心跳加速是为下一步行为做准备。如果你的呼吸变急促,没关系,它会让你的大脑获得更多的氧气。那些被如此告知的参与者反道比较不那么崩溃、比较不紧张,更加自信,但更让人欣喜的发现是,他们的生理反应也随情绪有了变化。

【第二项研究】

I want to finish by telling you about one more study. And listen up, because this study could also save a life. This study tracked about 1,000 adults in the United States, and they ranged in age from 34 to 93, and they started the study by asking, "How much stress have you experienced in the last year?" They also asked, "How much time have you spent helping out friends, neighbors, people in your community?" And then they used public records for the next five years to find out who died.
我想通过另一个研究来结束今天的演讲。听好咯,因为这项研究可以救命。这项研究在美国找了1000个年龄在34岁到93岁间的人,他们通过一个问题开始了该研究:“去年的你,感受到了多大的压力?”他们还问了另一个问题:“你花了多少时间帮助朋友、邻居和社区里的其他人?”接着他们用接下来五年的公共记录来看参与者中有谁去世了。

Okay, so the bad news first: For every major stressful life experience, like financial difficulties or family crisis, that increased the risk of dying by 30 percent. But -- and I hope you are expecting a but by now --but that wasn't true for everyone. People who spent time caring for others showed absolutely no stress-related increase in dying. Zero. Caring created resilience.
那好,先说坏消息:生活中每个重大的压力事件,例如财政困难或者家庭危机,会增加30%的死亡风险。但是,我估计你们也在期待这个“但是”,并不是对每个人都是那样。那些花时间关心其他人的人完全没有体现出压力相关的死亡风险。零风险。关心让我们更有韧性。

And so we see once again that the harmful effects of stress on your healthare not inevitable. How you think and how you act can transform your experience of stress. When you choose to view your stress response as helpful, you create the biology of courage. And when you choose to connect with others under stress, you can create resilience.
于是我们再次看到压力对于健康的有害影响并不是不可避免的。如何对待和应对压力可以转变你面对压力的体验。当你选择将压力反应视为有益的,你会在生理上变得有勇气。当你选择压力下与他人沟通,你的生命会更有韧性。

【演讲者简介】

Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal is a leader in the growing field of “science-help.” Through books, articles, courses and workshops, McGonigal works to help us understand and implement the latest scientific findings in psychology, neuroscience and medicine.
斯坦福大学心理学家 Kelly McGonigal 是新兴研究领域“科学救助”中的领先者。通过书籍、文章、课程以及研讨会等多种形式,McGonigal 致力于帮助我们将最新的研究成果应用到心理学、神经学和药学中去。

在线地址:http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/nMjOG9zTTOI/